Sprouting Chickpeas (a.ka. Garbanzo Beans)

Americans call them Garbanzo beans, we seem to call them chickpeas – really I think it has more to do with the predominant international cooking influence in your given area.  Garbanzo is what they are referred to in Mexican cooking, but we seem to have way more Middle Eastern cuisine here on the east coast of Canada – at least I’ve yet to meet many Mexican restaurants other than a Taco Bell tacked onto a KFC (yes I know that doesn’t really count)!

I’m trying out sprouting again, I did it about a year ago then ran out of seeds.  Now I’m learning some of my dried beans and legumes can be sprouted too, and I’m starting with chickpeas!  You can find a good tutorial here, no special equipment needed, at Serious Eats. And, if you wondering “can I sprout it and how?” you can look up your seed, legume or bean at Sprout People (this is the chickpea entry) for a little write up including yield of sprouts from dry and nutritional info.

So, this is more of a method than a recipe – recipes on how to use the sprouts will follow, if this experiment isn’t a miserable failure!

Sprouting Chickpeas (a.ka. Garbanzo Beans)
Soak the chickpeas for 12 hours in cold water. Don’t be foolish like me and think things would be happier soaking in hot or warm water – I think this is why my quinoa seeds got mouldy!

Soaking for 12 hours.
Soaking for 12 hours.

The yield should be 1:2 so sprout half the amount of chickpeas you want. I’m doing 1 cup dry.

After the soaking, drain and rinse the chickpeas, then tip the jar upside down over a draining rack on the counter at a 45′ angle, like this:

Rinsed, drained, and tilted on a rack to continue draining.
Rinsed, drained, and tilted on a rack to continue draining.

Day 2:  Not much action so far, rinsing twice a day (at least) in cold water.

The dish drain rack is a great place to prop up the chick peas.
The dish drain rack is a great place to prop up the chick peas.
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